Keyboard

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The keyboard element represents the source of key presses/releases in a disposition. You can have as many wikipedia:keyboards as you like.

You can use jOrgan's customize wizard to easily adjust keyboards to your required wikipedia:Midi settings.

Properties

input
The wikipedia:Midi device to receive messages from.

References

coupler, stop
The elements to relay key presses/releases to.

Referenced from

None.

Messages

PressKey
The message to interpret as a press of a key. Variables: pitch [0 - 127], velocity [0 - 127]
ReleaseKey
The message to interpret as a release of a key. Variables: pitch [0 - 127]

For listening to standard note-on/note-off messages on channel 0 you have to use the following messages:

Name MPL
PressKey equal 144, get pitch, get velocity
ReleaseKey equal 128, get pitch,

For other midi channels you can adjust the wikipedia:Midi status, i.e. 144-151 and 128-135 respectively.

Some midi devices send a note-on message with velocity 0 instead of a note-off. In this case you have to adjust the messages as follows:

Name MPL
PressKey equal 144, get pitch, greater 0 | get velocity
ReleaseKey equal 144, get pitch, equal 0

Transposed Keyboard

To transpose a keyboard you have to alter all its messages.

To transpose by once octave (i.e. 12 semi tones):

Name MPL
PressKey equal 144, sub 12 | get pitch, get velocity
ReleaseKey equal 128, sub 12 | get pitch,

Keyboard Split

If you want to control two or more keyboards with the same input, you can adjust their messages to be limited to a certain key range only.

To limit a keyboard to a the lower half of the key range (i.e. pitch 0 to 64):

Name MPL
PressKey equal 144, less 64 | get pitch, get velocity
ReleaseKey equal 128, less 64 | get pitch,

Non-touch sensitive Keyboard

Usually organ keyboards are not touch sensitive. If your keyboard still sends different velocity values (as most Midi keyboards do) you should fix the velocity of key presses to an explicit value.

To fix the velocity to 100 use the following message:

Name MPL
PressKey equal 144, get pitch, set 100 | get velocity

Second touch Keyboard

If you have a real second touch keyboard with separate key contacts you can present it with an ordinary keyboard element in jOrgan. But even without an additional hardware you can simulate a second touch on a single wikipedia:Midi device:

Velocity

If you limit the PressKey and ReleaseKey messages to a certain velocity range, you can control to which key presses the keyboard will react. This won't give you the exact feeling of second touch on a real organ though.

To limit all key presses to a velocity greater 80:

Name MPL
PressKey equal 144, get pitch, greater 80 | get velocity
ReleaseKey equal 128, get pitch,

Note the value 80 - any key press with a higher key velocity is interpreted as a press of a key.

Poly Pressure

A Poly pressure midi message (160) is very well suited to simulate a second touch keyboard. Regretfully most Midi keyboards are not equipped to send these messages.

For such a setup you can use the following messages:

Name MPL
PressKey equal 160, get pitch, greater 80 | get velocity
ReleaseKey equal 160, get pitch, less 80

Any poly pressure with a velocity greater 80 will be interpreted as a press of a key. </note>

Pedal

A pedal is just another keyboard in your disposition - it doesn't matter if you're using your feet to play it.